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Know limitations when it comes to fire hazards

Check with local authorities before lighting any fires.
Beaver Glen
While summer is the season for backyard fire pits and camping bonfires, it is imperative residents know the risks and use proper precautions when starting any kind of fire.

SASKATCHEWAN — Did you know there are three kinds of limitations issued when it comes to fire risks in the province. The province is asking you to stay informed about fire bans, fire advisories and fire restrictions.

A June 7 social media post from the Saskatchewan Provincial Safety Agency outlines a restriction as meaning a certain type of burning will be restricted at this time, while other types will be allowed. A fire ban is required when a municipality has taken steps to restrict or prohibit most types of fire use in that area. A fire advisory is issued when a higher fire risk is indicated, with possibly burning restrictions, and signals a warning for potential stricter alerts.

Understanding the differences, as well as continually checking with local authorities before lighting any fires, is imperative to environmental protection and everyone’s safety.

You can check the Saskatchewan Provincial Safety Agency interactive fire ban map for a list of active bans at https://www.saskpublicsafety.ca. The site’s interactive map informs people of limitations established by local municipalities, provincial parks or SPSA itself.

Residents can also check the Saskatchewan Spatial Management fire map, which is updated daily at fwi_today.pdf (gov.sk.ca) This map’s color coding indicates what parts of our province are under low, moderate, high and extreme fire hazards and provides a good overall indicator of fire danger.

While summer is the season for backyard fire pits and camping bonfires, it is imperative residents know the risks and use proper precautions when starting any kind of fire.

The recent, relentless high winds across the province can quickly eliminate benefits from timely rains, as well as include an added risk for open fires in the province. It’s only June, meaning temperatures are only going to get warmer and, depending on what other weather conditions Mother Nature delivers, could add to the fire hazard risk.

The Tourism Saskatchewan provincial parks webpage states, “Occasionally due to extreme fire hazards, the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport will issue restrictions on open fires in provincial parks and recreation sites.

“During Fire Restrictions or Bans: All wood burning fires in the park are prohibited. CSA approved self-contained portable gas heating devices and fire pits, barbecues, pressurized stoves and charcoal briquettes will be permitted for cooking and heating purposes at park discretion. These measures will remain in place until conditions improve and the fire restrictions have been lifted.”